Leftists & Gulags

Overview of The Gulag

According to The History Channel – the gulag was a system of forced labor camps established during Joseph Stalin’s reign as dictator of the Soviet Union.  The world “gulag” is an acronym of “Glavnoe Upraveline Lagerei”, or Main Camp Administration.  These infamous prisons incarcerated about eighteen million (18,000,000) people throughout their history, were in operation from the 1920s until shortly after Stalin’s death in 1953.  At its height, the gulag network included hundreds of labor camps that held anywhere two thousand (2,000) to ten thousand (10,000) people each.  According to The History Channel, condition in the gulag were brutal:

Prisoners could be required to work up to 14 hours a day, often in extreme weather. Many died of starvation, disease or exhaustion—others were simply executed.

The gulag was first established in 1919, and by 1921 the system had eighty-four (84) camps, it wasn’t until Stalin’s rule however, that the prison population would reach significant numbers.  From 1929 until Stalin’s death, the gulag system went through a period of rapid expansion.  Stalin viewed the camps as an efficient way to boost the Soviet Union’s industrialization, and provide access to valuable natural resources.

Additionally the gulag became a destination for victims of Stalin’s Great Purge campaign.  Which was a campaign designed to eliminate dissenting member of the Communist Party and any who challenged the leader.

Prisoners of The Gulag

The History Channel’s website has this to say about the treatment of prisoners in the gulag system.

The first group of prisoners at the Gulag mostly included common criminals and prosperous peasants, known as kulaks. Many kulaks were arrested when they revolted against collectivization, a policy enforced by the Soviet government that demanded peasant farmers give up their individual farms and join collective farming.

When Stalin launched his purges, a wide variety of laborers, known as “political prisoners,” were transported to the Gulag. Opposing members of the Communist Party, military officers and government officials were among the first targeted. Later, educated people and ordinary citizens—doctors, writers, intellects, students, artists and scientists—were sent to the Gulag.

Anyone who had ties to disloyal anti-Stalinists could be imprisoned. Even women and children endured the harsh conditions of the camps. Many women faced the threat of rape or assault by male prisoners or guards.

Without notice, some victims were randomly picked up by Stalin’s NKVD security police and hauled to the prisons with no trial or rights to an attorney.

 

Gulag Apologist LGBT Activist Group

According to the Daily Wire an LGBT activist group at Goldsmiths University in London has said that Soviet style forced labor camps – the gulags – were a “compassionate, non-violent course of action” for bigots who opposed their agenda.

The Telegraph goes on to further detail a bizarre exchange between the activist group with a special needs teacher named Claire Graham, who objected to the group’s denunciation of feminist academics that view transgender women as not being actual women, which makes them undeserving of female privileges – shared bathrooms included.  These kinds of feminists are often referred to as T.E.R.F.s (Trans-Exclusionary Radical Feminists) by activists.

The LGBT activist group said on Twitter:

 “The ideas of TERFS and anti-trans bigots literally *kill* and must be eradicated through re-education,”

Graham responded in turn:

 “I said that I thought their choice of language, in talking about lists and purging people was intended to shut down debate about trans people and the law. I then received unpleasant and dehumanizing threats about being sent to the Gulag. I feel bad for other trans people because this kind of response by some makes them seem so extreme and intolerant.”

It was from this point that the Goldsmith LGBT activists start apologizing for the Soviet forced labor camps, and said the gulags were a “compassionate” measure that would make the subject a better person – non-violently.

They’re quoted as saying:

“The penal system was a rehabilitatory one. The aim was to correct and change the ways of criminals, much like wider Soviet society, everyone who was ‘able’ to work did so at a wage proportionate to those who weren’t incapacitated and, as they gained skills, were able to move up the ranks and work under less supervision.  Educational work was also a prominent feature of the Soviet penal system. There were regular classes, book clubs, newspaper editorial teams, sports theatre and performance groups.”

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The group then goes on to say that the gulag network was slandered by the CIA as a part of some vast conspiracy, and that every historian who has ever denounced it as one of the most oppressive prison systems ever must be in on this vast international conspiracy.  To quote Barry Obama:

“We don’t have time for a meeting of the Flat Earth Society.”

The Twitter thread continues:

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However, the gulag network was much, much, worse than a government-sponsored vacation.  Aleksandr Solzhenitzyn, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature, survived eight (8) years in a gulag, and wrote about it in his book, “The Gulag Archipelago”.

Historian Anne Applebaum, author of “Gulag: A History” said:

“It was an incredibly brutal system designed to eliminate Stalin’s’ enemies and terrorize the wider population. Most of the inmates were innocent of anything we would regard as a crime.”

A statistic given in the Daily Wire article states:

An estimated 1,053,829 people died in those camps between 1934 and 1953.

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Gulag inmates were forced to construct the White Sea-Baltic Canal (Belomorkanal) between 1931 and 1933. According to official records and accounts in the works of Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, between 12,000 and 240,000 laborers died during the construction of the canal.

5018A01300000578-6161613-A_young_boy_in_a_Soviet_camp_poses_showing_his_starving_boy-a-13_1536793781797

A young boy in a Soviet camp poses showing his starving boy with a large cross draped around his neck.

 

The Editor Weighs In

The picture of the young boy, starving to death sure looks like he’s enjoying his time in an educational, compassionate, non-violent “camp” – happy and healthy as he enjoys the merits that come to him from being a gulag.  (This is sarcasm.)  This is the kind of stuff that this group of radicals is saying everyone who doesn’t agree with them should be subjected to.  What kind of…  Shit is this?  These radicals clearly don’t have any concept of what history has shown us of the forced-labor camps, and you know what they say about those who don’t know history – they’re doomed to repeat it.  Sickening.

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